Friendica Project Update – August 2012

by Mike Macgirvin

A lot is going on in the Free Social Web - and especially with the Friendica project so I thought I would take a few minutes to provide a general update.

In July 2012 we forked the Friendica project into two different paths. But relax, Friendica is not going away. In fact, we've got a bunch of new developers adding some great new features and functionality as I write this. We've got some new features in the works - support of animated GIFs, mobile themes (and mobile clients), fully threaded comments and the ability to like/dislike comments, etc. We've also got some fun new activity stream methods and games.

But as every software project grows, there comes a time when one needs to look at the bigger picture and adjust the project to accomodate a changing landscape. That's what we're doing currently.

Introducing Friendica Red

As a result of this introspection, we've put some of our development resources into Friendica Red, which is being created to fix some of the underlying issues which affect Friendica and the entire free social web in fundamental ways.

Relax, we aren't trying to force you into a new mode of interaction with your friends - these issues are much more fundamental to decentralised social communications.

 

The first is what we call the "mobility problem".

 

The free web is mostly provided by volunteers - some with technical expertise, some without. Occasionally it becomes a burden to run a public server/hub for others and as a consequence sites tend to come and go - and this can leave their members in a lurch, often needing to start over finding their friends and re-connecting with all of them.

We're also aware of recent political events which makes a reliance on a single DNS endpoint somewhat problematic.

So we're building an overlay network on top of DNS. We still rely on DNS to find your profile and photo albums, but here's the exciting part - you can move. And this is going to be built-in to our communications layers. You can just show up at a different service provider and keep communicating with your existing friends.

 

Then there's the "only geeks run servers problem".

 

To solve this one we need to provide incentives for organisations to provide servers for people. The best incentive we can think of is to allow them to offer subscriptions and paid "premium" services. Now before you start yelling "but that's NOT a FREE social web", look back at the last sentence and notice the word "allow". We aren't going to force anybody to do anything. If you want to provide a subscription service or a free service, that's up to you. We just want to make it easier for server providers to justify spending their time and money to support the free social web. You can always run your own hub for friends and family for free.

 

Friendica also has a bit of a "scaling problem".

 

This is due primarily on the fact that we offer connections to a huge number of other services. Many of these don't offer "direct delivery" so we must poll them frequently to find out if there's a new message for your stream. This is fine for a small server with a handful of people, but if you're running a large server with a few thousand people or more and they all have hundreds of contacts and connections, it just doesn't work. So Red is going to be limited in what it can connect to, just so that we can get some large servers to hold the rest of your friends. But we aren't abandoning the concept of a federated social web. You may choose to use Friendica and have connections to lots of other services, but limit your site to friends and family - OR you can use Red and support thousands of people on a moderately sized server, but without all of the connections to Facebook and Diaspora and email and WordPress blogs, etc. Each project will focus on doing one of these aspects well.

 

Friendica has been criticised repeatedly for having a boring and outdated interface. We'll call this the "UI problem". 

 

Red isn't a complete re-write (why fix things that aren't broken?), but some significant chunks of Friendica are being re-written. In particular we're doing a much more complete job of separating the "look and feel" from the backend communications logic. We'll provide a very simple and basic theme to tie it all together, but what Friendica Red looks like really depends on the theme designer, and they'll be able to create a viewport which looks and acts in different ways on different devices, and may even offer completely different functionality.  For instance on a handheld device, there are some bells and whistles of the desktop interface which just get in the way. The theme designer can decide not only how the page looks and works, but to a great degree what tools and widgets they wish to put on the page. So one can have Friendica Red for youngsters, and Friendica Red for information scientists. Both can communicate just fine, but the information scientist may have a whole lot more buttons and settings to make their interaction more tailored to the way they wish to access information.

We're also doing a lot more javascript and AJAX stuff in the browser, once again depending on what theme you use. On the backend, we're just building communication services which respond to requests. It will be up to your visual interface which precise requests to make.

 

We're long past the days of Facebook, yet your friends are too entrenched in their Facebook (so-called) life to even consider leaving. We'll call this the "Facebook envy problem".

 

Facebook still provides the lion's share of social communications on the web, despite their arrogant and abusive privacy implementation.  But as far as features, Friendica is far from lacking. Heck for those that are nostalgic about the old web, we now even have "pokes" and a free web version of FarmVille (which doesn't annoy your friends, incidentally). But Facebook is so 1997. Many of its features are for a usage model that is long gone.  The world moved on, but Facebook did not. We're trying to re-evaluate what constitutes a "friendship" in the modern free web. It isn't yes/no, on/off, friend/notfriend.  And we've got some clever innovations to share in this regard. The first is how you make friends, or rather if you make "friends" at all. We're providing a communications service. Your friends are your concern. So instead of having a button that says "share" or "follow" or "add friend", we're just going to present a person, and let you define how much (if at all) that you wish to interact with them, and how much you wish to let them know about you. When you get right down to it, it's just a set of permissions. We're also extending Friendica's existing "private profiles", where you can have a completely different profile for one group of people (like co-workers) than you do for drinking buddies, and making the process a lot more automatic.

We don't think you should even be asked if you want to be "friends" with somebody who you may not have ever met personally, but you may wish to allow them to see some of your technical writings, and perhaps allow them to ask questions via private mail. So we're just going to ask you what this person should be allowed to do. Do you want to see their posts in your stream? Do you want them to see (some of) your posts? Do you want to send private/direct mail to them? 

Since this is independent of the UI, anybody will be able to create a theme which models one of the old friendship interfaces such as "Add friend", "Share", etc. just by pre-defining the available permissions within that theme. But we can also create new interfaces which do a lot more and allow you greater control over each contact and what you allow them to do and see. A prime example is on wall-to-wall posts. Since your profile wall is often a reflection of your own personality, you might want only to allow a few really good friends to post there - not casual acquaintances and perhaps not the people you partied with in college.

And then once you've figured out what permissions and interaction you wish to have with this person, we'll allow you to declare how close (or not) you are with this person. This number is private to you, but we're putting slider bars on different pages which let you instantly adjust the page contents based on how close or far people are from your inner circle of friends. So when you first go online in the morning, you can look at just the important updates from only your closest friends. At lunch time, you might wish to have a look at some of the more distant people in your social circle and see what they're up to.

 

And we've also got a specific issue related to Friendica's design that we'll call the "multiple account problem".

 

Public groups, and private groups and celebrity pages and profiles all have separate accounts in Friendica. This is so that they can each have a unique URL. But we knew long ago this was sloppy. We're also assuming that in Red, one person may have a subscription relationship with their hub provider. So we're separating the "account" completely from pages and profiles. You'll have one account, period. Within that account, you can create any number of pages and groups (up to the limit the hub provider sets).  So there's one login. And these are hierarchical, so that one paid subscriber might create additional login accounts for family members, which are completely independent but if the subscription lapses, they all go away. (Relax, remember mobility - you can move and pop up somewhere else. And you're still you.). 

 

Communications in a decentralised model creates what we call a "fan-out problem".

 

Some of you may remember "zot" - the backend protocol we have been developing, but which got off to a couple of false starts. Zot is being revived as the layer which provides our mobility and DNS independence. The spec is currently under development; but in a nutshell, we're also solving the "fan-out problem", which is what happens when somebody posts a message to 1000 friends. This creates 1000 encrypted posts which must all be individually delivered. 

The new zot works a lot differently. Consider the post office delivering 1000 large boxes. They go to each house, get somebody to sign for the box, and take it off a very large truck. With the new zot model, the post office will ride around on a motorcycle and leave a small note for each of them we have a package. Pick it up at your convenience.  You no longer need a large truck. And if several people live in the same apartment building, when one comes in for pickup, we can give them all the boxes for that building. Messages are still just as secure as they were before, but with orders of magnitude improvement in delivery performance. 

 

We're also re-thinking our "global directory problem".

 

There shouldn't be a central or global directory of people in a decentralised social web. But when Friendica was young, we needed a way to find people within the network. And the provider we chose for the global directory has some uptime issues, which means when it's down, it's down for everybody. So we're changing the model. We don't want to force every hub to hold the entire directory, because this could be a problem for small sites as the network grows.

So we're borrowing a concept from software distribution called the "mirror". We'll have multiple directories hosted from different providers and locations - and they will all replicate their changes amongst each other (using zot). So if one directory goes down, there will be another that can take its place. 

We also initially had two directories, one for the site/hub and also the global directory. This was confusing to people. So now we're only going to have one directory. The reason we had this was if somebody wanted a disconnected Friendica which didn't connect with the rest of the grid; we didn't want to force them to use a global directory. We will still provide this option, by providing a stripped down version of the global directory (with exactly the same interface) but which doesn't replicate with other sites. 

 

Anyway, this is Friendica Red, and this is what we're building.

It's all open source and you're welcome to join us.

 

Pixelfed

Pixelfed want to be an alternative of Instagram. It will be federated with ActivityPub like Mastodon, Pleroma or many other plateform. Untill now you didn’t have any similar app as Instagram.

 

The only tools that could be similare was quit.im based on Gnusocial

It was a good start but Gnusocial seems to be slow developped and they didn’t have implemented ActivityPub yet.

 

Pixelfed was on early developpement today (end of July 2018) but we can start using it with few instances already available.

What is interesting is that the creator Daniel wanted to polish the look and feel. Contrary to other libre project that code the core first and then try to make a good design at the end, here you have a polished application. Many option are not open yet. You still can publish pictures, you have filters, you can comment and follow and been followed.

The federation is not open yet. That means that you cannot follow people from other instance.

If you are curious and want to create an account, you can find instance at the federation

 

Hubzilla 3.8 out

Mario announce in a post the availibility of Hubzilla 3.8

As you can see from the changelog, Hubzilla has gone through a very busy development cycle. To simplify the settings and improve the general UX, we have re-organised the entire apps and settings infrastructure.
Some features from the « Additional Features » section have been transformed to stand-alone apps and will need to be installed by the channel owner. Other features have been moved to the per app settings pages which are now easily accessible from the navigation bar or the app store.
Some addons have already been ported to the new apps infrastructure. This work is ongoing and will be completed during the next development cycle.

Other notable changes:

 

    • Remove tech-levels
    • Markdown table support
    • New addon (channelreputation) which provides a reputation system for community channels
    • Implement a subscriptions submodule for the cart addon
    • New addon (hsse) that implements a WYSIWYG editor
    • Experimental queue worker improvements (off by default)
    • Many under the hood improvements and bugfixes

 

As always, a big THANK YOU! to the translators and everybody who is helping to improve Hubzilla.

Howto upgrade:
Due to some profound changes to the addons it is necessary to follow this update procedure:

 

  • util/safemode on this will disable all enabled addons
  • util/udall the actual update which executes git pull for core and addon repos
  • util/safemode off this enables the previously disabled addons again
  • Install the upgrade info addon (optional) – this will show some info about the upgrade to your community members

The first web site

Do you know the first web site of the world.  It was http://info.cern.ch In Switzerland

Even today you can browse it as it was in 1991.

 

 

Friendica 3.1 release

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of Friendica 3.1


Changes from ~friendica 3.01 to 3.1
============================

Big ones
--------
  • pokes
  • threaded coversations
  • you don't have to use a LAMP server, you can also use Windows
  • documentation improvements (and translation into DE)
  • move accounts
  • Hide many advanced features by default to simplify adoption, all can be enabled or turned on by those who require them
 
Small fixes
-----------
  • notification issues with wall-to-wall messages
  • wallmessages
  • better language detection
  • Diaspora -
  • make likes and comments work
  • image links
  • does not support threaded comments :-/
  • they changed the public key format, so we need to fix
  • profile updates (user avatar)
  • SQL improvements (speed)
  • API improvements -
  • now returns Error 404 if function is not implemented
  • mark items seen when seen via tha API
  • CSRF hole in API
  • photos -
  • use gd as a backup for imagick
  • image caching
  • rotations
  • better exif handling
  • minification of JavaScript footprints in page loading
  • bbcode (new elements: style, class, crypt)
  • better oembedding from audio
  • moods
  • better handling of funny looking links (underscores etc)
  • deletion of accounts
  • hiding posts from archived contacts
  • writeability for OStatus contacts
  • tool po2php needed some love
 
Theme stuff
-----------
  • dispy
  • quattro
  • frost
  • frost-mobile
  • fixes for mobile devices for all themes
  • DarkZero / NS
  • vier
  • smoothy
  • diabook
 
UI Improvements
---------------
  • sparkle & shiny
  • fixes fpr the editor
  • admins & user can select mobile themes
  • new user get a contact group "friends" and all new contacts can be placed into a default group, admins can make it the default that new users post to the friends group as default setting
  • admins cant block or delete themselves anymore
  • live updates
  • handling of the homepage when a home.html exists
 
Languages
---------
  • many updates for existing languages, CS, DE, FR, ES, IT most notable
  • new languages from Transifex imported into git (after they passed the 50% mark)
  • PL thanks to Adam Jurkiewicz
  • IS thanks to axelt
  • ZH-CN thanks to matthew_exon
  • nb_NO thanks to Haakon Meland Eriksen
 
Addon stuff
-----------
various fixes and improvements to
 
  • Calendar
  • facebook connector
  • facebook support officially stopped as they don't like having others making a better experience
  • fbpost
  • libravatar
  • alternate pagination
  • libertree
  • privacy image cache
  • OpenStreetMap
  • remote permission
  • page deprecated go with forumlist instead!
  • forumlist
  • forumdirectory
  • from app
  • jappix mini
  • impressum
  • piwik
  • statusnet & twitter connectors
  • fortunate
 

Hubzilla 3.8 out

Mario announce in a post the availibility of Hubzilla 3.8

As you can see from the changelog, Hubzilla has gone through a very busy development cycle. To simplify the settings and improve the general UX, we have re-organised the entire apps and settings infrastructure.
Some features from the « Additional Features » section have been transformed to stand-alone apps and will need to be installed by the channel owner. Other features have been moved to the per app settings pages which are now easily accessible from the navigation bar or the app store.
Some addons have already been ported to the new apps infrastructure. This work is ongoing and will be completed during the next development cycle.

Other notable changes:

 

    • Remove tech-levels
    • Markdown table support
    • New addon (channelreputation) which provides a reputation system for community channels
    • Implement a subscriptions submodule for the cart addon
    • New addon (hsse) that implements a WYSIWYG editor
    • Experimental queue worker improvements (off by default)
    • Many under the hood improvements and bugfixes

 

As always, a big THANK YOU! to the translators and everybody who is helping to improve Hubzilla.

Howto upgrade:
Due to some profound changes to the addons it is necessary to follow this update procedure:

 

  • util/safemode on this will disable all enabled addons
  • util/udall the actual update which executes git pull for core and addon repos
  • util/safemode off this enables the previously disabled addons again
  • Install the upgrade info addon (optional) – this will show some info about the upgrade to your community members

Osada decentralised social networking

After Gnusocial, after Diaspora, After Friendica, hubzilla, Mastodon and others an new social network is coming.

OSADA

Osada is a decentralised social networking application more familiar to refugees from Facebook and other conversational style social networks than it might be to those migrating from microblogging social applications such as Twitter.

Osada is very easy to use and provides a range of features either natively or through standard ‘Apps’. These include photo albums and file storage managers, events with attendance support, and topical groups/forums, all of which respect your personal privacy groups (such as Friends, Family, Coworkers, you name it).

ActivityPub Support

Osada has native support for the ActivityPub protocol (W3C standard) as well as the more advanced but lesser known Zot6 protocol. It can inter-operate with other social networking applications and projects in either of these spaces; for instance Mastodon, Pleroma, Pixelfed, PeerTube, Funkwhale, Zap, Friendica, Hubzilla, and many more.

Hyper-drive

A novel Osada feature which is unique to Zotlabs projects is the built-in hyper-drive social engine. This technology is essentially the secret sauce behind Facebook’s meteoric growth over a decade ago and this is the first time we’ve managed to replicate the essential bits using a decentralised protocol.

Public servers

There are a small but growing number of public servers available if you would like to try Osada without providing your own personal or community server environment. A list of these is available here. Only sites on this list with « Osada » in the « Software » name are compatible with projects using the W3C ActivityPub protocol. As the project is still in its infancy, we welcome additional public servers. There is a lot of interest in the project and we could use some help spreading the load.

Free and Open Source

The architecture supports themes and addons and a number of these are available today. Osada is open source under the permissive MIT license and runs on most modern LAMP servers, using MySQL/PostGres and Apache/Nginx. We are passionate about providing ethical and decentralised services running on open source platforms.

If you want to install it go to

https://framagit.org/macgirvin/osada

PeerTube 1.0 : a free and federated video plateforme


Peertube is a federation of sites that host videos. PeerTube uses WebTorrent technology. Each server hosts a torrent and each web browser viewing a video reshares it. This allows to share the load between the server itself and the clients as well as the bandwidth used through P2P technology.

The system works via a federation of instances run by independent entities. Each PeerTube server can host any number of videos by itself, and can additionally federate with other servers to let users watch. This federation permits to collectively host a large number of videos in a unified platform, without having to build an infrastructure comparable to that of the web giants. Each server is operated by and stays under the sole administration of a distinct entity.

PeerTube uses the ActivityPub protocol, in order to allow decentralization and compatibility with other services such as Hubzilla, Mastodon

15th of October 2018 the first version 1.0.0 has been relases.

If you want to know more about peertube and join an instance : go to https://joinpeertube.org/en/

 

Osada social network compatible with ActivityPub and Zot6

Osada is a social network compatible with ActivityPub (Mastodon, Pleroma, Peertube, pixelfed, Hubzilla etc… ) and zot6. It is based on the Hubzilla framework. That means if you are familiar with Hubzilla you will not be lost. The founder of Hubzilla never called Hubzilla a social network but a powerful platform for creating interconnected websites featuring a decentralized identity, communications, and permissions framework built using common webserver technology.

Osada is quite new in october 2018 and you will not find many information on search engine now. So if you need to know more I can give you a link on conversation about osada.

conversation 1 Conversation 2

Now let’s talk technicks

 

Osada is a gateway server between nomadic and non-nomadic networks (such as between Zot|Zot6 and ActivityPub|Diaspora|Ostatus). A reference implementation is available at https://framagit.org/macgirvin

The purpose of Osada (« gypsy settlement ») is to resolve the dilemma that software which was not designed around nomadic identity won’t actually work correctly with software that is nomadic. The only other alternative is for all web communications software and protocols to be nomadic-aware and this is unlikely to happen.

In prior efforts such as RedMatrix and Hubzilla, federation with non-nomadic networks was offered as a choice. You could choose federation or nomadic identity. Choosing both leads to a situation where expected communications are not delivered and both federation and nomadic operation are flawed in basic ways. Osada resolves this basic dilemma by providing a gateway service between the two incompatible paradigms.

At a high level, Osada provides a non-nomadic server which can federate with all existing networks (to the extent that those networks permit federation; ActivityPub and Diaspora have limitations on their ability to federate third-party messages between incompatible protocols).

On the nomadic side, Osada does not allow nomadic operation itself, but it supports nomadic communication. It uses a Zot6 concept called « linked identities » to transfer information into and out of the nomadic network. The linked identity on the Osada side is not a clone and has a distinct non-nomadic identity. It can be bound to a nomadic identy on the Zot6 network. All federation and cross-protocol communication occurs at the bridge. If the linked identity relationship is severed for any reason (including failure/shutdown of the bridge), all bridged communications will cease.

Osada identities can be moved/relocated and connections on non-nomadic networks which support account moves will be retained. Connections on services which do not allow moves will be lost.

People inside the nomadic network will make connections to the nomadic identity. People on outside networks will make connections to the Osada identity and will be (likely) unable to resolve the internal nomadic identity as something they are able to federate with

If you want to try osada : https://osada.usezot.net/ the-federation.org have not added that project yet. I hope it will be added soon

 

 

An introduction to the protocol that powers Hubzilla

The world is full of protocols. Some are loosely defined by society, and some are rigidly defined by their architects. In many urban environments, for example, there is a protocol for how you ride an escalator: if you choose to stand, you stand on the right side so that those who choose to step can get past on the left. If you ignore this protocol, you may get some annoyed looks but you will still get where you are going. More rigid protocols, such as the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) that governs most communication on the web, can be much stricter and more elaborate. If your browser puts one semicolon in the wrong place you can forget about seeing those cute cat videos.

So what does that have to do with Hubzilla? And for that matter, what is Hubzilla anyway? Hubzilla is free and open source software designed to support your freedom and privacy; anyone can run it on their own server and inspect the code to learn how it works. It is an advanced platform for online communications and content publishing that provides decentralized access control. That last bit is the critical difference between Hubzilla and all the other blogging platforms, social networking sites, and messaging systems that dominate the web today, and it is precisely the motivation for inventing Zot instead of choosing from the plethora of existing communication protocols. To appreciate what is so innovative about Zot, we need to explain first what « access control » means and then why « decentralized » makes the problem of access control challenging.

Like protocols, the world has no shortage of access control. Does your house have locks on the doors? Do you let everyone watch you take a shower, or do you prefer to control access to that activity? How about conversations about your finances? I bet you publish those on billboards, right? Of course not! We all constantly control access to things for many reasons.

And sometimes you want to have a private conversation with someone that no one else should read.

Electronic publications and communications are no different. You may want to publish an article like this one for the whole world to read, but you may also want to participate in a restricted access forum online where members of your neighborhood can discuss community issues. And sometimes you want to have a private conversation with someone that no one else should read.

The traditional centralized solutions to these problems have existed for many years and are what virtually everyone currently uses online. This is because it is relatively easy to manage access control when you have one central authority acting as the gatekeeper to content. Facebook is the most influential example of this model. If you send a message to a select group of friends, only they have access to it because Facebook (1) authenticates them by identifying who they are based on their knowledge of their secret account password and (2) authorizes them to access the message by verifying that they are on the message’s access control list (ACL), which is the technical term for what you created when you « sent » them the message.

There are several fundamental and serious problems with this centralized model. Arguably the biggest problem is that you do not own your identity. But that’s absurd, you might immediately retort, of course I own my identity! Well, let’s consider what ownership means. Ownership of identity means, for one thing, control. If you own your identity, you control it somehow. With Facebook and similar centralized services, they alone have the power to create and delete your online identity. They grant you access to your identity when you log in. As the years roll by and you share all sorts of content with all the people you have connected with, you may be alarmed to discovered that you need the centralized service. If you want to leave, all of that shared content and all those connections vaporize. What’s worse, you can’t even share something privately with people unless they also allow their identities to become hostage to the platform. It’s like some kind of pyramid scheme.

They grant you access to your identity when you log in.

Now we can begin to appreciate some of the benefits of decentralization in our online communications. When you register an account on a “hub” — a server running Hubzilla — you can make connections with other people and share things even when they are on completely independent hubs operated by different companies or organizations. This is the essence of what it means when we say Hubzilla is a decentralized network. We like to call the network of Hubzilla-powered websites “the grid”. There is no single entity that controls the network or, by extension, you. It is ironic that this needs explanation, because the most ubiquitous and long-lasting online communication system — email — is a shining example of decentralization. Anyone can run an email server and exchange emails with other people, even if they are using an email server hosted by a separate business or university. As robust as email has been historically, however, it lacks a lot of capabilities that we want in modern communication. It is designed for passing small messages back and forth; it is not designed for controlling access to published content hosted on a modern website using secure encryption methods. This is what Hubzilla is designed to do. Hubzilla lets you do things like share photos privately with only your family and friends, or publish news articles only to paying subscribers, even if none of these people have an account on the server hosting the content.

What makes Hubzilla truly unique is combining the ideas of decentralized access control and identity ownership. The result is something that is frankly revolutionary: it’s called nomadic identity.

To be clear, providing decentralized access control is an impressive feat per se. There are only a few other platforms available that provide this capability on the « standard » internet of websites accessible by browsers over HTTP. What makes Hubzilla truly unique is combining the ideas of decentralized access control and identity ownership. The result is something that is frankly revolutionary: it’s called nomadic identity. Truly owning your online identity means that you maintain your contacts and access to the things people have shared with you even if you change accounts on different servers. It means that you can have clones of your identity on independent hubs allowing you to maintain your online presence and continue communicating even when one of your servers is unavailable (temporarily or permanently). No other platform provides this level of robust identity ownership.

Visit http://hubzilla.org to learn more about what Hubzilla can do for you…

Podcast about funkwhale

Funkwhale is a modern, self-hosted, free and open-source music server

 

Funkwhale is a music plateforme federated by Actitiypub

 

  Unlimited music

Funkwhale is designed to make it easy to listen to music you like, or to discover new artists.

  • Click once, listen for hours using built-in radios
  • Keep a track of your favorite songs
  • Playlists? We got them

  Clean library

Funkwhale takes care of dealing with your music.

  • Import music from various platforms, such as YouTube or SoundCloud
  • Get quality metadata about your music thanks to MusicBrainz
  • Covers, lyrics, our goal is to have them all 😉

  Easy to use

Funkwhale is dead simple to use.

  • No add-ons, no plugins : you only need a web browser
  • Access your music from a clean interface that focus on what really matters

  Your music, your way

Funkwhale is free and gives you control on your music.

  • The plaform is free and open-source, you can install it and modify it without worries
  • We do not track you or bother you with ads
  • You can invite friends and family to your instance so they can enjoy your music

You’re interested? Some things are still missing to make the project easily installable, but this is moving fast. We’ll be publishing installation instructions soon, stay tuned!

Nomad mobile application for hubzilla

Nomad is an application for Hubzilla. It  You can install it from the Fdroid application.

 

It’s currently under development and should be used with that in mind. Please submit any bugs you might find. We are basing our work on the dandelion* app. The is a webview based app developed as a WebApp

Why is a WebApp better than using the mobile site on a browser? Basically it provides better integration with the system (events coming into and going out of the app), customized interface and functions and a nice little icon that takes you directly to your favorite social network 🙂

Follow news from the Nomad Channel nomad@hub.disroot.org

 

Go to this page to download it

 

Maybe this application works with Osada and zap

WordPress-activitypub

WordPress Activityüub is supposed to connect WordPress and ActivityPub

 

https://github.com/pfefferle/wordpress-activitypub

From GNU social to Mastodon : History of the fediverse

I think they were also hamstrung by a faith in free software ideology to draw people in. The truth is that software needs to be pretty polished to get a look in either way.

Tom Karpiniec wrote an interesting article about the fedivevse. Today Mastodon has a wave of adoption due to the change of rules at Twitter. Before Mastodon was Gnusocial who try to open the way. But the users was mainly libristes and geeks.

 

That article talk about Quit.im the fist try of Instagram alternative, of Hubzilla and Friendica and all other projects.

New users have been coming to the fediverse in waves. There’s always been a background level of organic growth but most of the action happens when Twitter does something stupid. Twitter does stupid things on a fairly regular schedule so this constitutes the bulk of the growth. People search for Twitter alternatives and sign up. Many of them get bored and leave again. Some stay, and the process continues

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