Red – welcome to the network

 

The Friendica project is pleased to announce the Developer Preview release of "red" -  a new concept in online communications.

Because somebody has to stand up for the people of the internet...

You may obtain a copy via git at https://github.com/friendica/red

The Developer Preview is intended for developers to have a look at the emerging project and possibly influence its direction. This is not intended as a preview to the general public. There are bugs. There are security and privacy issues. Things could crash spectacularly. If this doesn't sound like fun to you, please avoid this preview and wait for a public preview or release. Not all the described features are complete, but you might be surprised how much works today - for a pre-release project of this scope.

Red is kind of like a decentralised social network (along the lines of  identi.ca, Friendica, and Diaspora) , but we've thrown away the rule book. Red has no concept of "people" or "friends" or "social". Red is a means of creating channels which can communicate with each other and to allow other channels permission to do things (or not). These channels can look like people and they can look like friends and they can be social.

They can also look like a great many other things - forums, groups, clubs, online websites, photo archives and blogs, wikis, corporate and small business websites, etc. They are just channels - with permissions that extend far beyond a single website. You can make them into whatever you wish them to be. You can associate web resources and files to these channels or stick with basic communications. There are no inherent limits. There is no central authority telling you what you can and cannot do. Any filtering that happens is by your choice. Any setting of permissions is your choice and yours alone.

You aren't tied to a single hub/website. If your own site gets shut down due to hardware or management issues or political pressure, the communication layer allows you to  pop up anywhere on the Internet and resume communicating with your friends, by inserting a thumb drive containing your vital identity details or importing your account from another server. 

Your resources can be access controlled to allow or deny any person or group you wish - and these permissions work across the Red network no matter what provider hosts the actual content. Red "magic-auth" allows anybody from any Red site to be identified before allowing them to see your private photos, files, web-pages, profiles, conversations, whatever.  To do this, you only login once to your own home hub. Everything else is, well - magic.

Red is free and open source and provided by volunteers who believe in freedom and despise corporations which think that privacy extortion is a business model. The name is derived from Spanish "la red" - e.g. "the network".

Welcome to "the network". Welcome to the free web. Welcome to the grid. Red has arrived.

Hubzilla 1.14 officially released!

Hubzilla is actively developped. Here is a long list of new feature and corrections.

Hubz are independent general-purpose websites that not only connect with their associated members and viewers, but also connect together to exchange personal communications and other information with each other.
This allows hub members on any hub to securely and privately share anything; with anybody, on any hub – anywhere; or share stuff publicly with anybody on the internet if desired.

Core:

 

  • New hook bbcode_filter
  • Unify the various mail sending instance to enotify::send() and z_mail()
  • Provide ability for admin to change account password
  • Replace deprecated Sabre functions
  • Add plugin hook for ‘get_profile_photo’
  • Convert NULL_DATE to a legal date for compatibility with MySQL strict mode
  • Allow a site to over-ride the help table-of-contents files
  • Autoscroll to target post/comment when in single-thread mode
  • Indicator for own response verb activity
  • Add server role documentation
  • Pro: remove ‘Additional Features’ link for techlevel 0
  • Upgrade fullcalendar library to version 3
  • Whitelist button tag in htmlpurifier
  • Upgrade justifiedGallery library to version 3.6.3
  • Pubsites improvements
  • Upgrade foundation library to version 6.2.3
  • Ability to move photos to another album
  • Submodules for settings page
  • Submodules for admin page
  • Remove chatroom suggestions
  • Revamped and improved theme select backend
  • Theme preview
  • Implement techlevels for pro server role
  • BBcode checklist
  • Improve save to folder modal dialog
  • Case insensitive sort apps
  • Add authors to post distribution
  • Redirect to plugin page after enabling to show configuration settings if applicable
  • Move allowed email domains to admin->security page
  • Display text around the searched query in documentation search
  • Comanche observer conditionals
  • Remove ratings
  • Context help for /connedit
  • Provide configurable sidebar table-of-contents indexes for different levels of the help hierarchy
  • Comanche conditionals
  • Cover photo enhancements (does not disappear after initial scrolldown)
  • Website import/export
  • Server roles (basic, standard and pro)

Bugfixes:

 

  • Fix connected time not shown on ajax loaded connections
  • API issues
  • Fix readmore.js collapsing on scrolldirection change in some mobile browsers
  • Personalize Server Emails
  • Audio player doesn’t automatically show for m4a files
  • Fix ajax page update with /channel?f=&mid=hash
  • Angle bracket characters in DB password not recognised
  • Regression: files/photos were not synchronising to channel clones properly
  • Missing categories in preview mode
  • attach_store() sql issue
  • Rename id share_container to distr_container – share_container seem to be blacklisted in various security browser plugins
  • Add ‘map’ extension to files served natively by nginx without using the project controller
  • Zot discovery wasn’t returning in all cases (after discovering zot)
  • Do not show hidden channels in /randprof
  • Numerous postgres fixes
  • Illegal offset errors in include/conversation:status_editor() when no permissions array is passed
  • Patch foundation-6.2.3 to work with jquery-3.1
  • Custom/expert permissions bug
  • Mail: return array instead of object
  • Don’t send purge_all notification to self
  • Saved search: tags and connection searches weren’t being saved
  • Do not allow PERMS_PUBLIC as a choice for writable permission limits
  • Force cover photos as well as profile photos to be public. As a side effect ‘thing’ photos will also be considered public
  • Make lock switching actually work with multiple acl forms
  • Create smarty dir before any templates can be initialised
  • Fix aconfig
  • Broken doc search
  • Public forum check with custom/expert permissions

Plugins:

 

  • Standard Embed: update to convert old corporate bbcodes
  • Cdav security: fix rw permission check
  • Cdav: add partial support for recurring events in the browser client (editing/creating is not implemented)
  • New plugin phpmailer: use phpmailer class instead of php’s built-in mail() function
  • Diaspora: third party on other network comment issue
  • Diaspora: comment fix (hubzilla originated comment with plugin activated by comment author not making it to Diaspora)
  • Cdav: provide calendar list view
  • Diaspora: allow comments on public diaspora posts which were imported by subscribing to public tags.
  • Wppost: add blog_id parameter for WordPress MU sites such as WordPress.com
  • Wppost: don’t log the password in normal mode
  • Hubwall: provide choice of sender addresses, the real admin email, postmaster, or noreply.
  • Chord: General cleanup of chord app
  • Chord: Update chord binary for modern linux systems
  • Start grouping addons by server_role

Hubzilla on wikipedia

As it is apparently hard to create a new page on wikipedia, here is the draft version of hubzilla page. A draft could be deleted and as this page is not bad and could be copy just in case.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draft:Hubzilla

Hubzilla (formerly known as Redmatrix) is a community management platform that is designed to mesh with other instances running the same software. It is considered a platform for federated networking, and is compatible with both Diaspora and Friendica. Hubzilla is notable for combining aspects of social networking, blogging, forums, cloud storage and content management all into one application.

Hubzilla
Original author(s) Mike Macgirvin
Developer(s) Hubzilla community
Stable release 1.3. / March 2016
Written in PHP
Operating system Cross-platform
Platform Apache, Nginx
Type community management platform
License MIT License
Website [1]

 

Development History

In 2012, Mike Macgirvin of the Friendica project stepped down[1], and formed an experimental communication platform named Friendica Red. This system existed for exploratory purposes, and was designed based on lessons learned from developing Friendica.

Much of the design concepts for the new platform would be based on ideas about user identity management and privacy permissions. It leverages a unique federation protocol named Zot, which acts as the design successor to Friendica’s DFRN protocol.

As time went on, Friendica Red was rebranded RedMatrix, before the name Hubzilla was decided on. On December 24th, 2015, Hubzilla 1.0 was officially launched[2].

Features

Hubzilla can be defined as a decentralized communication and publishing platform. Any server running Hubzilla is defined as a hub, which can function independently of any other hub in the network.

Channels

Channels are a core concept for the platform – in short, each channel is an activity stream of objects that can represent a specific action, such as a posting a status or uploading a photo. This stream can show both public and private activities, and an ACL permissions system determines which users can access a given entry. Each channel also contains a unique Webfinger address, for example https://example.com/channel/bob would be represented as bob@example.com

A Channel can be created for the following use-cases:

  • A Social Stream
  • Blogging
  • Branded Product Streams
  • Group Forums

A user is assigned their first channel upon registration, but they can create as many different channels as their hub allows. Each channel in turn can connect to another channel as a contact. This mechanism will allow a user to interact with posts, as well as post on the wall of other channels as themselves. Private messages and statuses can also be passed back-and-forth from one connected channel to another.

MagicAuth

MagicAuth is a type of in-browser encryption that grants access permissions on remote hubs. In a sense, it is a workaround to a long-standing problem in federated social networks: ordinarily, users couldn’t visit each other’s profiles and directly interact with them if both people are connected through different servers. MagicAuth exists as a means of granting access permissions to visiting users. The use-case works like so:

  1. Bob’s channel is on https://example.com/channel/bob, with the channel address of bob@example.com
  2. Bob visits Alice’s channel at https://othersite.com/channel/alice, ie, alice@othersite.com
  3. When Bob visits, his browser session performs a cryptographic handshake with Alice’s channel
  4. Bob is allowed to comment and like posts on Alice’s channel while he is visiting.
  5. Bob will also see private posts meant for him when visiting.
  6. If Alice allows people to make posts on her wall, Bob will be able to do that as well.

Cloud Storage

By default, each channel is given DAV access for file storage. This storage includes uploaded photo albums, and can allow for videos and other documents. Cloud storage can be accessed through a DAV client, and in some instances be integrated into the desktop file manager itself.

Web Pages

Channels are allowed to create web pages based on a templating system.

Directories

Themes and Layouts

Plugins

OpenID

Hubzilla can also function as an OpenID provider, allowing users to log into OpenID-enabled sites with their Hubzilla channels.

See also

References

 

 

  1. Macgirvin, Mike. « Hubzilla (1.0) release ».

External links

Friendica 3.2 Release

Friendica team is proud to present Friendica 3.2, the new version of our Personal Federated Communication Server.
What's new:

 

  •  Friendica now is licensed under the terms of AGPL
  • Import/Export user account
  • New and updated themes
  • Better handling of statusnet discussion threads
  • Support Open Graph and Dublin Core when showing single items
  • Updated communication with Diaspora
  • Use APC if present
  • Improved installation script
  • Improved administration panels
  • Improvements to SQL queries
  • Improvements to search function
  • Bug fixes:  #516, #517, #525, #476, #540, #546, #712, #728

More in changelist.txt ( https://github.com/friendica/friendica/blob/3.2/changelist.txt )

How to update:
If you installed Friendica via git, simply pull from our repo ( https://github.com/friendica/friendica/ )
If you installed Friendica uploading files via FTP, download last version ( https://github.com/friendica/friendica/archive/3.2.zip ) and upload it to your server, overwriting old files.

Coming in September 2014: Friendica Hackathon in Berlin, Germany

(Reposted from Tobias Diekershoff)

Upcoming in September: Friendica Hackathon in Berlin, Germany.

From Sept. 5th to 7th 2014, some Friendica developers and users will be gathering in Berlin to work on software improvements. Everyone is invited to join.
The plan is to work on some issues (label Berlin2014) and to get to know other friendica friends in person. We hope to see non-coders as well as coders! People who know about UI, who would like to test or document changes are very welcome! If you can't come in person but you'd like to work with us, join us on IRC (#friendica on freenode, UTC +2 ;) ) or in the forum!

The venue:
Groessenwahn, Kinzigstr. 9, 10247 Berlin, Germany (http://kinzig9.de/gwl.html)
The venue is not accessible in a wheel chair.

If you are somehow involved with friendica and you would like to join, poke us! There is still a limited amount of sleeping places available.

"Us" - that's tugelblend@snarl.de, tobias@f.diekershoff.de and freiefunken@pink.pilot.io

Hope to see you in September!!!

What is a nomadic identity

Nomadic identity is not easy to understand. This is a new concept.. Hubzilla is a decentralisated community publication plateform that use nomadic identity. Mike Macgirvin explain with a simple example what is nomadic identitiy

 

 

I’ve had to answer a lot of questions about nomadic identity recently. It’s not that hard. Let me try and bring it to an easier conceptual level.

For our example we’ll start with email since it’s a concept many people sort of understand.

You’ve got a friend named Bob. Bob has two email accounts. He has a home account at bob@home.server, and he has a work account at bob@work.server . Now most people instinctively know that if they get an email from either address, that they’ve received an email from Bob. They usually don’t even think about what server he is using.

Nomadic identity just means that when we send an email, we will send to both of Bob’s addresses any time we send an email to Bob. This way he’ll get the message no matter if he’s at home or if he’s at work.

Simple enough? Good, let’s continue.

Now let’s take this into the decentralised social networking space such as provided by Hubzilla. What’s different? The only thing is that if Bob posts a picture while he’s at work, his work server send a copy to his home server so he’ll have the same picture in his photo albums in both places. If he makes a new friend, the friend will be added on both servers so he has the same friends no matter where he goes.

Now if Bob loses his job and his account gets removed from work.server, Bob’s onlife life still goes on and he still knows the same people and still can post the same things. He’ll just use home.server; and then when he gets a new job, he can send you stuff from bob@newjob.server. Your software will instantly notice – « hey, this is my friend Bob! » even if it has never heard of newjob.server before and update some stuff internally to indicate that Bob can now be reached at newjob.server.

None of this matters to you, because as far as your software is concerned, it’s just ‘Bob’. You don’t care what server he uses or what job he has this week.

That’s what nomadic identity is all about..

Hubzilla 2.0

For Christmas a new version of Hubzilla is out.  One year after version 1, this version has now better database capability, a wiki that works well, a new twitter API and lots of User Interface bahaviour improved. Hubzilla with the nomadic identity is really a software that goes where anyone has gone.

Here is a somary writen by Mike the founder of Hubzilla

 

The database driver has now been converted to PDO, which was the last remaining work to be done to bring the project up to what we call an « enterprise grade » architecture and began exactly a year ago. In the process of doing this work, we fixed a lot of compatibility issues with postgres – which should now work reasonably well.

The wiki and help pages (project documentation) had a number of usability issues and all of the known issues have been addressed. Wiki pages can now be created in bbcode, which is much more expressive in its ability than markdown.

The API was redesigned and many of the base functions are now documented. The Twitter API was moved to a plugin so you can still use Hubzilla with hundreds of third-party apps and social clients.

The ‘hl’ (highlight) tag was added to our reportoire by request.

Lots of UI behaviour changes to streamline the flow and ease repetitive tasks. Too many to list individually. The « left side » menu was also made ‘sticky’ to ease navigation on lengthy and infinite content pages.

Zot, the base protocol was extended to allow negotiable encryption algorithms; allowing sites to create their own encryption stacks and harden their communications against state-sponsored actors.

Edited posts and comments will now appear on Diaspora (which does not support editing of posts and comments).  There were several other fixes for Diaspora protocol and communications issues.

Superblock was re-written entirely and it is now much easier to remove blocked channels from the blacklist. It is also much harder for their posts to appear in your stream anywhere, and they can never write on your wall; even if you have relaxed comment permissions.

In addition we fixed hundreds of bugs and fixed a lot of « little stuff » that nobody complained about, but we felt should be improved to make this a world-class app.

Since 1.0 – the entire project has been re-written and completely re-architected to provide an enterprise-grade software base going forward. All corporate and external dependencies have been moved to plugins. Most anything that was limited « by design » was reworked and the limitations removed; for example the permissions infrasrtucture. Along the way we introduced new functionality in most areas of the platform and continued re-working the UI to make it more consistent and usable. The project also supports three base modes (but this could be extended) to provide functionality tuned to different uses such as for federation or enterprise use. The list of individual changes since 1.0 is quite staggering. I haven’t done a count but I believe it probably represents around a half a million lines of code changed; possibly much more than that. The total amount of work is quite impressive given the small team and numerous distractions we faced from critics and trolls along the way.

Hubzilla – Registering an account and getting started.

How to federate hubzilla and gnusocial

Prerequisite : You should have an account on a hub that allow gnusocial protocol. For that the admin has to activiate the PubsubHubBub protocol and then activate the gnusocial protocol

If it is done you have to activate the activate the gnusocial protocol

settings > Feature/addon Settings > GNU-Social Protocol Settings (Just activate it)

Now it is ready for communication with gnusocial. Go to your connexion list and add the gnusocial.

 

 

Your gnusocial contact should add your Zot Id as well,

Tell me if it works for you or not.  The federation is on the GO

 

The history of Hubzilla

Hubzilla History

Hubzilla is a community developed open source project based on work introduced in Friendica by the Friendica community and which previously was named Redmatrix. The core design, the project mission, and software base itself were created/written primarily by Mike Macgirvin and represent the culmination of over a decade of software design using variations of this platform and an evolving vision of the role of communication software in our lives. Many others have contributed to this work, both conceptually and in terms of actual code (far too many to list individually).

Mike Macgirvin — Biography

Mike Macgirvin is an American software engineer now living in Australia. He spent his early adult years designing and repairing semiconductor fabrication equipment for a number of companies as a self-described « machine wizard ». In 1985 he became a research engineer at Stanford University for the Gravity Probe-B space mission and soon became a Unix systems administrator writing communication software and utilities; and becoming an expert in emerging internet technologies such as the now ubiquitous « World Wide Web ». He authored an email « client » called « ML » which pioneered some advanced concepts in encryption, the ability to filter message streams into different « views », and multi-protocol support; and was an active proponent of and participant in the open source software movement. In 1996 he went to Netscape Communications to become tech lead on their Messaging Server and integrate this with Collabra (groupware) into a comprehensive communications server package. He stayed on after Netscape was acquired by America Online and was tech manager of the Groups@AOL project until 2001.

During a layoff round, Mike was let go from America Online in August 2001 and purchased a music store in Mountain View, California later to be known as « Sonica Music Company ». Opening a retail store for non-essential goods at the beginning of a prolonged economic downturn was in retrospect probably not the wisest career move. Sonica eventually folded; in late 2006. Mike returned to working on software and systems support full-time and was employed briefly at Symantec before moving to Australia in early 2007. He currently lives on a farm « out in the middle of nowhere » and is employed as a Computer Systems Officer at the University of Wollongong.

Hubzilla – The Early Years

The software which went into creating Hubzilla has been through several distinct historical phases. It began in 2003 when Mike Macgirvin was looking for a content management system to power the website for his music store and found the available solutions to be lacking in various respects. The project was born as the « PurpleHaze weblog » under the nom de plume « Nerdware Communications ». It was a multi-user PHP/MySQL CMS which provided blogs, forums, photo albums, events and more. Initially it provided the basis for a social community and shopping for customers of the store, but was also linked to Mike’s personal weblog running on another domain. The distinguishing characteristic of this software was the ability for so-called « normal users » to re-assemble the components and choose different content feeds – and in essence create their own personal « multi-user CMS » as a view. Their custom view was able to communicate with anybody else that used the system, but could be partitioned so that adult sites and motorcycle enthusiast sites would not be visible to each other and not clash (or in this case Mike’s personal website and the music store website). This software was developed primarily from 2003 until 2008.

In 2006 this software was used as the prototype for Symantec’s « safeweb » reputation and community site. It was developed and enhanced until about 2008. A rewrite took place in 2008 named « Reflection » but work stagnated as the community dwindled. The need for content management systems and communications software dropped dramatically during this time as humans flocked to the new social aggregrators – Facebook and Twitter.

Mistpark/Friendica

In early 2010, Mike left Facebook, concerned at the company’s increasing hold and control of personal information. In his words « Companies die. We watched it happen in the dot-com years. When they do, their databases are sold to the highest bidder. ». Mike used some remnants of the old CMS project to create a decentralised social communications platform. This was launched in July 2010 as « Mistpark ». The name was chosen as a tribute to his new home in the Southern Highlands of Australia. The key innovation in this project was the ability to authenticate remotely and invisibly to other decentralised instances of the software so to allow remote viewing of private photos and provide « wall-to-wall » posting across website instances. The lack of simple remote identity provenance was a serious limitation of other decentralised communication protocols.

In late 2010, the name was changed to « Friendika ». The name Friendika had some symbolic issues, since the suffix was common with « swastika » and « Amerika », both having negative connotations, however the dot-com domain was available. Friendica was in fact the first choice but the ‘friendica.com’ domain name was already registered. It became available a year later and the project was renamed to Friendica in late 2011.

Soon after version 1 was released in July 2010 – providing basic social communications, the software also took on a new role – cross-service federation; which was first introduced in August and September 2010. Federation allowed the software to « behave as » a StatusNet site and friends and messages could communicate to the other service from their own platforms. It was also hoped to provide federation with Diaspora – a project with similar scope being developed in secret in New York and first released in November of that year. Over the course of the next year, the federation ability was extended to provide integrated communications from RSS feeds, to and from email, StatusNet, Facebook, Twitter, and the emerging Diaspora project. The software provided a single « view » of your entire social space no matter what provider you or your friends used. StatusNet and Diaspora were supported natively so that one account could access any of these services. Facebook and Twitter used « API federation » which required the person to have an account on those services with which to link.

By July 2012, Twitter and Facebook had both changed their terms of service and essentially outlawed « API federation » in the way Friendica was using it. Diaspora announced they were changing their protocol and would not maintain compatibility nor provide any warning when compatibility would break (or documentation on the proposed changes). The creator of StatusNet was also leaving his project to create something new (pump.io). As the software’s primary purpose by this time was « federation of different social services into one interface », this created a bit of a crisis. The federated social web was crumbling. Also of concern was that independent and decentralised social websites shut down frequently, requiring all their members to start over again on another site. Often the effort involved to do this seemed daunting – and many people ran back to the relative safety of the large corporate providers – Facebook, Twitter, and now Google+.

Mike realised he did not want to be held hostage to the decisions that other projects and companies and independent websites make. Friendica could operate on its own without attaching to these other networks, but its vision and implementation of a federated social world depended on federation with others for its project identity – so this created an identity crisis.

Mike had been working on this project for some time and there were a number of things which needed re-writing, including the base communication protocol which Friendica used (DFRN or the « Distributed Friends and Relations Network » protocol). These ideas were starting to emerge as a different method of communication he called « zot ». Zot began as a way to create a common language for federated websites, but there was no interest in this ability and as mentioned, the federated web was crumbling. The first version was soon scrapped and zot was re-designed and re-ignited as a streamlined communication protocol which was location-independent; e.g. not tied to any website. This would allow people to carry on unaffected if their website operator shut down temporarily or permanently. They wouldn’t have to make friends all over again, and permissions of everything on the system wouldn’t have to be changed to allow bob@site1 to see something that was private to him, even though he was now bob@site2. This was a serious problem with decentralisation. People moved and their online identities were lost and had to be re-created from scratch and existing relationships destroyed and had to be created all over again.

Redmatrix

In July 2012, Mike left the Friendica project and began development of « zot » and a new base project called « red » in his somewhat elusivespare time. Red is Spanish for « network ». It wasn’t really a « social network » and especially not a « federated social network ». It was just Red (technically « la red »), or « the network ». Work began by removing all the « federation » components and going back to basics – communication and remote authentication. It was a major re-write and took roughly six months before even basic communication was re-established. It was also no longer compatible with Friendica – which had been given to the « Friendica community » and by this time (December 2012) was developing separately on its own track.

It became clear during this time that the single most compelling feature of the project wasn’t the social network at all, but the authentication layer and decentralised access control mechanisms. Combined with zot’s location independence it created a new model for software which had never existed previously – decentralised identity-aware web publishing and single sign-on to any compatible provider across the web. These weren’t evolutionary, they were revolutionary. One of the biggest flaws of the modern web is the reliance on different passwords for every service you use, or reliance on a single provider if you were to tie them to – say your Facebook login. Facebook can remove your account at any time. Gone. If you rely on their authentication for all your websites, your entire online identity – now gone. This is also what was missing from Friendica – a compelling software feature which could stand on its own, without requiring a social network and especially without requiring a federated social network with all the mentioned external dependencies.

An early visitor to the project noted that he had some difficulty finding the project on Google because of the choice of name – « red ». Yes, this was a poor decision in retrospect. We were buried on page 23,712 of the search results. The concept that was emerging around this identity-aware publishing was that of « a matrix of inter-connected thought streams », since we didn’t have a concept of « people » and « friends ». All were just connected « channels » with different ways to connect. So « Redmatrix » was chosen to give it a searchable name. It had nothing to do with the Matrix film and red and blue pills, though that is frequently cited (erronously); and in fact isn’t a bad analogy.

The concept of identity-aware content was alien to anything that existed previously on the web, so to make it useful we had to provide the ability to use it for content. It needed content publishing tools. This brought back concepts from the old « Content Management System » on which the software was originally based. To get it up and running quickly we created a markup language for webpages called « Comanche » which let you describe a page in high-level terms based on bbcode tags. We also added WebDAV so you could put decentralised access control on files and drag/drop from your operating system. So now you could have private photos, webpages, files, events, conversations, chatrooms – and they are visible to those you choose – no matter what site they use. All they need is zot. And your viewers could move to another site or just pop up at a different site any time they want and we don’t care. And it also had a built-in social network; with lots of additional privacy and encryption features which were added even before the Snowden revelations gave them added urgency.

Over time a few federation components re-emerged. The ability to view RSS feeds was important to many people. Diaspora never really managed to re-write their protocol, so that was re-implemented and allowed Redmatrix to connect with Diaspora and Friendica again (Friendica still had their Diaspora protocol intact, so this was the most common language now remaining on the free web – despite its faults). Diaspora communications aren’t able to make use of the advanced identity features, but they work for basic communications.

Hubzilla

The Redmatrix project reached a point of stagnation in early 2015 as network growth leveled and active interest in the project declined. Mike met with several external high tech developers and innovators in a round of discussions that were called « Zotopia » in early 2015 to perform an independent review of the project and try to identify what had gone wrong and plan a route forward. The basic consensus is that the project suffered from bad marketing decisions which were compounded by mixed messages about the project goals and target audience. A « rival » project (Diaspora) was marketing itself as a Facebook competitor, but after some long discussions it was determined that Redmatrix wasn’t a Facebook competitor at all, and too much emphasis was being placed on the « social network » and « anti-Facebook » features. It was a novel decentralisation platform with distributed identity and permissions, and as was pointed out, the « end user » was the wrong target market. These marketing mistakes were now identified with the project name and random sampling of various « customers » showed that none of them really had a clue about the software goals or target market segment. The mixed messages were associated with the brand identity and this was a problem.

The Redmatrix community held a vote and the project was renamed « Hubzilla », with a renewed identity and focus – to provide software for creating and ultimately linking together unrelated community websites or « hubs » into a global community. This is in fact what we were building all along, but didn’t fully recognise it. The target audience for this software as it turns out is not the members or end users, but software integrators and digital community architects and builders. These in turn will be responsible for marketing their own product (their respective online communities) to end-users or members. The software solves a real world need of linking isolated and « walled garden » community sites together into a larger cooperative. The transition from Redmatrix to Hubzilla was complex and has taken several months as we consolidated the marketing and media assets to deliver a consistent message. It is still ongoing at this time, and should be completed in Q4 2015.

Mike stepped down as active coordinator for the project in early 2015 and turned management over to the community. He remains active as a Hubzilla developer.

And Then…

In 2016, the project was re-architected to support multiple server « roles ». These correspond to sub-projects which can be isolated from each other in terms of supported feature sets, but all use and support the same code-base and developers are able to work together on common features and goals. The roles primarily differ in target audience, project governance and decision making structures, and this results in slightly different features and idealogy. They all share a common code repository.

Those roles are:

Basic

Entry level server. Supported by and governed by the Hubzilla community. Most advanced or complex features have been stripped away to ease federation with external services. It is best suited as a FOSS social network tool.

Standard

The standard Hubzilla server. This provides a wide range of useful features and is supported by and governed by the Hubzilla community. It is best suited as an open source community and cloud server.

Pro

This is a specially crafted server with a unique feature set. It is supported by and governed by Mike Macgirvin dba « Zotlabs ». Federation with external services has been stripped away in order to support a wide range of more technically advanced and complex features; and also includes features and modes which may not have the support or backing of the Hubzilla open source community. It is best suited for business and workplace applications.

Hubzilla 1.14 officially released!

Hubzilla is actively developped. Here is a long list of new feature and corrections.

Hubz are independent general-purpose websites that not only connect with their associated members and viewers, but also connect together to exchange personal communications and other information with each other.
This allows hub members on any hub to securely and privately share anything; with anybody, on any hub – anywhere; or share stuff publicly with anybody on the internet if desired.

Core:

 

  • New hook bbcode_filter
  • Unify the various mail sending instance to enotify::send() and z_mail()
  • Provide ability for admin to change account password
  • Replace deprecated Sabre functions
  • Add plugin hook for ‘get_profile_photo’
  • Convert NULL_DATE to a legal date for compatibility with MySQL strict mode
  • Allow a site to over-ride the help table-of-contents files
  • Autoscroll to target post/comment when in single-thread mode
  • Indicator for own response verb activity
  • Add server role documentation
  • Pro: remove ‘Additional Features’ link for techlevel 0
  • Upgrade fullcalendar library to version 3
  • Whitelist button tag in htmlpurifier
  • Upgrade justifiedGallery library to version 3.6.3
  • Pubsites improvements
  • Upgrade foundation library to version 6.2.3
  • Ability to move photos to another album
  • Submodules for settings page
  • Submodules for admin page
  • Remove chatroom suggestions
  • Revamped and improved theme select backend
  • Theme preview
  • Implement techlevels for pro server role
  • BBcode checklist
  • Improve save to folder modal dialog
  • Case insensitive sort apps
  • Add authors to post distribution
  • Redirect to plugin page after enabling to show configuration settings if applicable
  • Move allowed email domains to admin->security page
  • Display text around the searched query in documentation search
  • Comanche observer conditionals
  • Remove ratings
  • Context help for /connedit
  • Provide configurable sidebar table-of-contents indexes for different levels of the help hierarchy
  • Comanche conditionals
  • Cover photo enhancements (does not disappear after initial scrolldown)
  • Website import/export
  • Server roles (basic, standard and pro)

Bugfixes:

 

  • Fix connected time not shown on ajax loaded connections
  • API issues
  • Fix readmore.js collapsing on scrolldirection change in some mobile browsers
  • Personalize Server Emails
  • Audio player doesn’t automatically show for m4a files
  • Fix ajax page update with /channel?f=&mid=hash
  • Angle bracket characters in DB password not recognised
  • Regression: files/photos were not synchronising to channel clones properly
  • Missing categories in preview mode
  • attach_store() sql issue
  • Rename id share_container to distr_container – share_container seem to be blacklisted in various security browser plugins
  • Add ‘map’ extension to files served natively by nginx without using the project controller
  • Zot discovery wasn’t returning in all cases (after discovering zot)
  • Do not show hidden channels in /randprof
  • Numerous postgres fixes
  • Illegal offset errors in include/conversation:status_editor() when no permissions array is passed
  • Patch foundation-6.2.3 to work with jquery-3.1
  • Custom/expert permissions bug
  • Mail: return array instead of object
  • Don’t send purge_all notification to self
  • Saved search: tags and connection searches weren’t being saved
  • Do not allow PERMS_PUBLIC as a choice for writable permission limits
  • Force cover photos as well as profile photos to be public. As a side effect ‘thing’ photos will also be considered public
  • Make lock switching actually work with multiple acl forms
  • Create smarty dir before any templates can be initialised
  • Fix aconfig
  • Broken doc search
  • Public forum check with custom/expert permissions

Plugins:

 

  • Standard Embed: update to convert old corporate bbcodes
  • Cdav security: fix rw permission check
  • Cdav: add partial support for recurring events in the browser client (editing/creating is not implemented)
  • New plugin phpmailer: use phpmailer class instead of php’s built-in mail() function
  • Diaspora: third party on other network comment issue
  • Diaspora: comment fix (hubzilla originated comment with plugin activated by comment author not making it to Diaspora)
  • Cdav: provide calendar list view
  • Diaspora: allow comments on public diaspora posts which were imported by subscribing to public tags.
  • Wppost: add blog_id parameter for WordPress MU sites such as WordPress.com
  • Wppost: don’t log the password in normal mode
  • Hubwall: provide choice of sender addresses, the real admin email, postmaster, or noreply.
  • Chord: General cleanup of chord app
  • Chord: Update chord binary for modern linux systems
  • Start grouping addons by server_role

Friendica 3.5 « Asparagus » released

After one and a half year of developing the « Lily of the Valley » (these are some 2100 commits by 26 people) it is time to welcome the « Asparagus », which brings many exciting new things, small improvements and many fixes along the way. Big Thanks to everyone who was involved in the process.

What is new in Friendica 3.5?

For the users most visible are the new theme Frio (which is currently marked as experimental) and enhancements to the vier theme. Both are mobile friendly so you don’t need to select a special theme when you are using one of them. Another visible aspect are the events. You can now signal your attendance to an event. Also sharing events was improved. Profiles now contain an overview of the public events and, if you like, links to export these events as ical or csv file.

Behind the curtain large parts of the code have been rewritten to improve the performance of Friendica and the federation with other projects using the OStatus or Diaspora protocols. The background processes can now be better controled by the node admin(s) by managing the workers. For a better overview in the code, you can now use doxygen.

With this release we also dropped the support for old versions of PHP and MySQL. The requirements are now PHP 5.4+ and MySQL 5.5.3+. or an equivalant alternative for MySQL (MariaDB, Percona Server etc.).

For a more complete list of changes, please have a look into the CHANGELOG or watch thegource visualization.

How to update?

If you have an installation using git, all you have to do is a git pull in the friendica and the addons directory. That will fetch the new version from the master branch and you are ready to go. Alternatively you can find a zip file of the released version of friendica at github.com fordownload. Just unzip it on your local machine and replace the files on your server with the new files.

Changes to the database will be applied automatically in the background. Especially on larger nodes the changes to the database structure might take some time in which your server will be in the service mode (maybe several hours). Additionally there are several changes to the data that are done in the background. These changes will cause a higher system load for some time (perhaps several days or weeks) but should not affect it too much since they are done sequentially to spare ressurces. Until the data update is finished some functionality will not work completely. For example the search for user posts will not return all data.

If you want to use the bleeding edge code and thus helping the project to discover problems, you should use the git method. Then checkout the develop branch of the source tree and let us know if you encounter something odd.

Update (Sept 17th): Some users reported unexpected high system load and hight numbers of PHP processes after the update to Friendica 3.5. This did not manifest in the tests before. To avoid these, please deactivated the cron job before making the update. Make the update as described above and then go to the admin panel. There is a new section « Worker« , which is a new mechanism to handle the background process. Please activate it and also activate thefastlane. Afterwards reactivate the cron job again.

How to contribute?

If you want to contribute to the project you do not need to have coding experience. There are a number of tasks listed in the issue traker with the label « Junior Jobs » we think are good for new contributors. But you are by no means limited to these—if you find a solution to a problem (even a new one) please make a pull request at github or let us know in the developmentforum.

Contribution to Friendica is also not limited to coding. Any contribution to the documentation, the translation or advertisement materials is welcome or reporting a problem. You don’t need to deal with git(hub) or Transifex if you don’t like to. Just get in touch with us and we will get the materials to the appropriate places.

Source 

Hubzilla 1.12 officially released!

Here is a list of the most important changes:

Core:

  • Extensible permissions so you can create a new permission rule such as « can write to my wiki » or « can see me naked ».
  • Guest access tokens can do anything you let them, including create posts and administer your channel
  • ACLs can be set on files and directories prior to creation.
  • ACL tool can now be used in multiple forms within a page
  • a myriad of new drag/drop features (drop files or photos into /cloud or a post, or drop link into a post or comment, etc.)
  • multiple file uploads
  • improvements to website import
  • UNO replaced with extensible server roles
  • select bbcode elements (such as baseurl) supported in wiki pages
  • bootstrap upgrade to version 3.3.7 (jquery 3 compatibility)

Addons:

  • Diaspora Protocol: additional updates to maintain compatibility with 0.6.0.0 and stop showing likes as wall-to-wall comments (except when the liker does not have any Diaspora protocol ability)
  • Cdav: continued improvements to the web UI
  • Pong: the classic pong game
  • Dfedfix: removed, no longer needed
  • Openid: moved from core to addon

Bugfixes:

  • fix unable to delete privacy groups
  • weird display interaction with code blocks and escaped base64 content containing 8 – O
  • workaround WordPress oembeds which are almost completely javascript and therefore filtered
  • restrict oembed cache url to 254 chars to avoid spurious failures caching google map urls
  • « Page not found » appeared twice
  • fix birthdays not being automatically added to event calendar
  • some iCal entries had malformed descriptions

More information on Hubzilla.org

British Library Sounds

Listen to a selection from the British Library’s extensive collections of unique sound recordings, which come from all over the world and cover the entire range of recorded sound: music, drama and literature, oral history, wildlife and environmental sounds.

Please note that for mobile and tablet devices running recent releases of the iOS operating system some longer recordings may not play in their entirety

 

http://sounds.bl.uk/

How to install Diaspora on Debian

Installing Diaspora / postgress

Just type this command

apt-get install diaspora-installer

Installing Diaspora / mysql

apt-get install diaspora-installer-mysql

 

Have fun

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